Current Talks

These are the talks for cSplash 2017.

A First Glance into the World of the Abstract

In this talk, I want to talk about plain, simple algebra. I'm not going to talk about polynomials or roots or anything like that. I'm going to get a little more abstract. This lecture will be an introduction into the subject of Modern Algebra. We will define what a group is, lay out the groundwork for some important Group theory results and then delve into specific examples of groups such as the cyclic group, the symmetric group, and the dihedral group.

Prerequisites: 
Basic Algebra, knowledge of complex numbers, combinations and permutations.
Professor: 
Nick Lewis
Difficulty: 
Difficult
Room: 
1302
Size: 
60
Enrolled: 
8

Applications of Mathematics to the Problems in Insurance

The problems in determining insurance premiums for different kinds of insurance policies and the amount an insurance policy has to keep in reserve to stay in business involves the application of different branches of mathematics, namely algebra, calculus, probability and statistics. This talk will focus on these areas and will include an example in automobile theft insurance, which deals with the problem of how an insurance company manages to insure automobile owners against the risk of theft.

Prerequisites: 
High school algebra.
Professor: 
Aaron Tenenbein
Difficulty: 
Easy
Room: 
512
Size: 
40
Enrolled: 
1

Dark Matter!

In the 1970’s, Vera Rubin and her collaborators discovered and established the “Dark Matter Phenomenon”. Despite four decades of intense effort, the nature of Dark Matter remains a major unsolved mystery of particle physics and astrophysics. This talk will highlight some particularly puzzling features and current theoretical, observational and experimental efforts to understand Dark Matter. The Dark Matter Phenomenon also presents a sociological puzzle: why wasn't a Nobel Prize awarded for its discovery?

Prerequisites: 
Scientific logic and basic facts known to students who have completed HS physics will be assumed.
Professor: 
Glennys Farrar
Difficulty: 
Easy
Room: 
512
Size: 
40
Enrolled: 
30

Data Analytics and Visualization

Technological advancement has empowered humans to achieve the impossible. Whether it's about self-driving vehicles, predicting loan delinquency, forecasting demands. The list is endless. All this is a result of capturing and leveraging data in an intelligent manner. In this class, we'll talk about the different qualitative and quantitative techniques and processes used to derive insights from data and generate elegant visualizations to help us make strategic business decisions.

Prerequisites: 
Basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel, Tableau and R would be helpful, however it's not necessary. Interest to explore the field of Data Mining and Analytics would be a plus.
Professor: 
Siddharth Singh
Difficulty: 
Easy
Room: 
312
Size: 
40
Enrolled: 
20

Entropy factor, or why improbable events happen.

Very often we hear about coincidences that seem bizarre or at least highly unlikely, such as unexpected encounters with long lost friends at remote locations. Isn't this ubiquity of improbable events odd? If an event is unlikely, doesn't this exactly mean that it happens rarely? I will try to explain what is going on with the help of basic models of probability theory.

Prerequisites: 
Basic calculus is a plus but not a strict requirement for this talk.
Professor: 
Yuri Bakhtin
Difficulty: 
Difficult
Room: 
517
Size: 
40
Enrolled: 
30

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